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Careers in the USA: Delivery Truck Drivers and Driver/Sales Workers

Delivery Truck Drivers and Driver/Sales Workers
Delivery drivers and driver/sales workers transport goods around an urban area or small region.

Quick Facts: Delivery Truck Drivers and Driver/Sales Workers

2012 Median Pay
$27,530 per year
$13.23 per hour

Entry-Level Education
High school diploma or equivalent

Work Experience in a Related Occupation
None

On-the-job Training
Short-term on-the-job training

Number of Jobs, 2012
1,273,600

Job Outlook, 2012-22
5% (Slower than average)

Employment Change, 2012-22
68,800

What Delivery Truck Drivers and Driver/Sales Workers Do
Delivery truck drivers and driver/sales workers pick up, transport, and drop off packages and small shipments within a local region or urban area. They drive trucks with a gross vehicle weight (GVW)—the combined weight of the vehicle, passengers, and cargo—of 26,000 pounds or less. Most of the time, delivery truck drivers transport merchandise from a distribution center to businesses and households.

Work Environment
Delivery truck drivers and driver/sales workers have a physically demanding job. Driving a truck for long periods of time can be tiring. When loading and unloading cargo, drivers do a lot of lifting, carrying, and walking.

How to Become a Delivery Truck Driver or Driver/Sales Worker
Delivery truck drivers and driver/sales workers typically enter their occupations with a high school diploma or equivalent. They undergo 1 month or less of on-the-job training. They must have a driver’s license from the state in which they work.

Pay
In May 2012, the median annual wage for driver/sales workers was $22,670. The median annual wage for light truck or delivery services drivers, was $29,390 in May 2012.

Job Outlook
Employment of delivery truck drivers and driver/sales workers is projected to grow 5 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. Improved routing through GPS technology can make existing truck drivers more productive, which may limit the demand for additional drivers.

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